Further information

Further information

Wood can be considered a material that supports health and recovery, although it is not yet known precisely what the positive effects of wood are based on. As a building material, the effect of wood on people has been studied in such countries as Norway, Austria, Japan and Canada. Although the studies have not yet been sufficiently systematic and comprehensive, based on them much wood-related folklore has been confirmed.

  1. Positive health effects of Stone Pine furniture. Joanneum Research, Institute of Non-Invasive Diagnosis.
  2. Solid fir furniture reduces strain during and after concentration periods. Human Research, Institute of Health Technology and Prevention Research.
  3. Gesundheitliche Auswirkungen einer Massivholzausstattung in der Hauptschule Haus im Ennstal. Human Research Institute, Institute of Health Technology.
  4. Opportunities for Increased Use of Wood as a Visual Material in Built Environments. David Fell, Patrick Lavoie. 2009. Quebec: FPInnovations – Forintek Division.
  5. Wood in the human environment: restorative properties of wood in the built indoor environment. David Fell. 2010. Vancouver: The Univerity of British Columbia.
  6. Influence of wood wall panels on physiological and psychological responses. Satoshi Sakuragawa, Yoshifumi Miyazaki, Tomoyuki Kaneko, Teruo Makita. J Wood Sci (2005) 51:136–140.
  7. Change in the impression of rooms with interior wood finishes arranged differently: questionnaire survey with the use of photographs for the analysis of impressions of rooms concerning living activities. Satoshi Sakuragawa. Wood Sci (2006) 52:290–294
  8. Effects of contact with wood on blood pressure and subjective evaluation. Satoshi Sakuragawa, Tomoyuki Kaneko, Yoshifumi Miyazaki. J Wood Sci (2008) 54:107–113.
  9. Behavior Changes in Older Persons Caused by Using Wood Products in Assisted Living. Anme T. et al. Public Health Research 2012, 2(4): 106-109.
  10. Influence of wooden-finish for reinforced concrete schoolhouse on elementary school student’s stress response. Tsurumaki, M. et al. Saitama University, Japan.
  11. Visual effects of interior design in actual-size living rooms on physiological responses. Tsunetsugu Y. et al. Building and Environment 40 (2005) 1341-1346.
  12. Trends in research related to ‘‘Shinrin-yoku’’ (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing) in Japan. Yuko Tsunetsugu, Bum-Jin Park, Yoshifumi Miyazaki. Environ Health Prev Med (2010) 15:27–37.
  13. Physiological effects in humans induced by the visual stimulation of room interiors with different wood quantities. Yuko Tsunetsugu, Yoshifumi Miyazaki, Hiroshi Sato. J Wood Sci (2007) 53:11–16.
  14. Restorative environment Project - Part 1. Nousiainen, Marjut. 2013. Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences.
  15. Wood use in a hospital environment: VOC emissions and air quality. Anders Q. Nyrud · Tina Bringslimark · Finn Englund. European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, 2012, Volume 70, Issue 4, pp 541-543.
  16. Patient rooms with different degrees of wood: a preference study conducted among hospital staff. Tina Bringslimark, Anders Q. Nyrud.  WCTE 2010 World Conference on Timber Engineering, Italy 2010.
  17. Is interior wood use psychologically beneficial? A Review of psychological responses toward wood. Anders Nyrund, Tina Bringslimark. Wood and Fiber Science (2010) 42: 202-218.
  18.  Evidence-based biophilic design. Tina Bringslimark, Kristian Bysheim, Anders Q. Nyrud. Science without Borders. Transactions of the International Academy of Science H&E, Special Edition International Conference Oslo 2009, 35-42.